How to Spot A Fake

Treasure Detectives is a terrific show that is broadcast on CNBC and today their Website posted a great video and article on how to spot a fake rare book.  You definitely need to check it out if you are a bibliophile.

You may also want to read my previous posts on rare books:

My March 4, 2011 post contains a link to a Wall Street Journal article about Bauman Rare Books.

Collecting Modern First Editions was posted on February 7, 2010.

A link to The Wall Street Journal’s article on beginning bibiliophilia can be found in my November 25, 2011 post.

Collecting books can be VERY rewarding, but is certainly not without hazards!  I stick to modern first editions which are easy to check and I always make sure to buy books I want to read.

Digital Public Library of America

From npr.org: The Digital Public Library, intended to provide free open access to materials from libraries, museums, universities and archives across the country, launches at noon ET on Thursday. The project began as an initiative at the Berkman Center for Internet and Society at Harvard, and was funded by foundations including the National Endowment for the Humanities and the Institute of Museum and Library Services. Robert Darnton, Harvard University librarian and history professor, in The New York Review of Books that “at first, the DPLA’s offering will be limited to a rich variety of collections — books, manuscripts, and works of art — that have already been digitized in cultural institutions throughout the country. Around this core it will grow, gradually accumulating material of all kinds until it will function as a national digital library.”

The Booklover’s Favorite Book for 2012 Wins Pulitzer Prize

This morning on the way to work, I was pleased to learn that The Orphanmaster’s Son won the Pulitzer Price for Fiction for 2013.  Congratulations to Adam Johnson!  The Orphanmaster’s Son is is a “surreal, feverish look at North Korea under Kim Jong Il. The protagonist Jun Do (a play on “John Doe”) grows up in an orphanage, and serves under Kim as a professional kidnapper before deciding to rebel against the state.”

Please read my review posted on December 5, 2011.  You might also enjoy reading the article about Adam Johnson’s Pulitzer win at npr.org.