Book Review: Five Days at Memorial


The Booklover’s Rating:  ♥ ♥ ♥

It took me months to read this book and the problem started right at the beginning. The horror for me began with the euthanasia of a cat in the beginning of the book and I just found it too much to read.  Ms. Fink won a Pulitzer Prize for her work on reporting the crisis at Memorial Medical Center when Hurricane Katrina struck in August 2005 and deservedly so, but this crisis made for a slow and arduous read for me. This book is not for the faint of heart.

Ms. Fink’s book begins with an account of the preparations at Memorial Medical Center begins as Hurricane Katrina approaches New Orleans.  Little did the staff, patients and families know that weathering the storm was only the beginning of a crisis that would last several days and ultimately result in 45 dead.

The book recounts the storm, its aftermath and the investigation into the events and deaths at Memorial Medical Center.  Fink forces readers to consider what is right and what is wrong in times of crisis, to examine how we would behave if put in the same or similar circumstances, and perhaps most importantly what is the role of government (local, state, and federal) versus the role of the individual in ensuring their own survival.

Five Days at Memorial is a thought-provoking and difficult read.

Disclaimer:  I received this book from Blogging for Books in exchange for an honest review.  All opinions expressed are my own.

Book Details:  Published by Broadway Books (January 26, 2016), 592 Pages, ISBN: 978-0307718976.

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The Booklover’s Favorite Book for 2012 Wins Pulitzer Prize

This morning on the way to work, I was pleased to learn that The Orphanmaster’s Son won the Pulitzer Price for Fiction for 2013.  Congratulations to Adam Johnson!  The Orphanmaster’s Son is is a “surreal, feverish look at North Korea under Kim Jong Il. The protagonist Jun Do (a play on “John Doe”) grows up in an orphanage, and serves under Kim as a professional kidnapper before deciding to rebel against the state.”

Please read my review posted on December 5, 2011.  You might also enjoy reading the article about Adam Johnson’s Pulitzer win at npr.org.